Yashurio Suzuki, Bowls of Beauty

Yashurio Suzuki questions the norms of society by creating these beautiful and crazy products. What you think of a product currently, will now be changed. 

Yasuhiro Suzuki, is a product designer from Tokyo who produces many creative ideas and works. Suzuki has won many awards for them, such as the interactive art prize and the grand-prix award etc. His products are shown all over the world, especially for their individuality. Having a different life experience to other designs, the basis of his works comes from his studies of science and technology. Hence he creates a concoction of scientific research and experimentation with materials to form such beauty, as seen in his work, The Cabbage Bowls (2004).

Cabbage Bowl, 2004 Yasuhiro Suzuki
Cabbage Bowl, 2004 Yasuhiro Suzuki
Cabbage_Bowl_by_Yasuhiro_Suzuki_04
Cabbage Bowl, 2004 Yasuhiro Suzuki

The beauty that you see in these Cabbage Bowls, go further in depth than the eye can see. The depth that is metaphorical and poetic but also questions the norms of disposability. The Cabbage Bowls are made from paper clay in a silicone moulding from real Cabbage leaves, but also just like paper plates, these Cabbage leaves can be disposed easily and stacked. However this is the allure of them, they are stacked to be reformed into the whole cabbage plant, creating further depth to have this deeper meaning of food and nature. Could you throw something so beautiful away, I know you would do it with normal paper plates? .

Cabbage Bowl, 2004 Yasuhiro Suzuki
Cabbage Bowl, 2004 Yasuhiro Suzuki

However, Suzuki isn’t the only one who has developed this idea of beauty in conjunction with disposability. Nao Tamura designed Seasons (2004) plates that were too inspired by the nature of Japan. Every leaf has its own shape, and too when stacked creates a sculpture. Tamura develops this idea from cultural experiences and strives to convey more depth as she mentions, “An object which has ceased to be useful can be recycled to begin life anew, in a fresh form. We must remain conscious of this cycle that exists in nature, just as we are conscious of the cycle of seasons.”

Seasons, Nao Tamura
Seasons, (2004) Nao Tamura
Seasons, Nao Tamura
Seasons,  (2004) Nao Tamura

Similar is her other design, The July Stool (2012) which connects to the natural stacking of wooden logs, each having individuality, but uniting to create a stunning singular form, to further represent this idea as well as nature within design.

Screen Shot 2015-05-08 at 11.37.22 am
The July Stool (2012) Nao Tamura
The July Stool (2012) Nao Tamura
The July Stool (2012) Nao Tamura

Suzuki’s, The Cabbage Bowls (2004) are not the only award winning designs, Bucket Stump (2007), a stunning piece that was inspired by the connection of the ripple of water and the ripple pattern that appears in a tree stump. Suzuki work contains the hidden symbolism and connection between time, water and trees as he states,“ From our human time perspective, we can’t see the growth of trees in terms of movement. However, if we could change the time scale, I imagine that the growth and multiplication of trees might appears instantaneous as the formation of the ripple pattern in the water.”  However this bucket is not usable. Which makes it that much more perfect. It expresses the relation between the water and tree through making the bucket to heavy to lift as if it is being stuck in the ground by its roots.

Bucket Stump (2007) Yasuhiro Suzuki
Bucket Stump (2007) Yasuhiro Suzuki
Bucket Stump (2007) Yasuhiro Suzuki
Bucket Stump (2007) Yasuhiro Suzuki

All of Suzuki’s work have this magical depth, where objects are displayed in ways we could never think of. The Daily Mail, Australia (2005) introduces one of his works as: When Moses thought of parting the sea you can bet he never thought of using a zip. Suzuki’s work, Ship of the Zipper (2004) is a creative work that conveys unlocking new journeys, as seen in the video below.

 

However unlike Ship of the Zipper (2004) he often creates things with more subtle metaphors such as The Eye Dropper (2005) connects a water dropper to an eyeball as a gun to a target hence the water dropper is designed in the shape of a gun, which is quite humorous.

Eye Dropper (2005) Yasuhiro Suzuki
Eye Dropper (2005) Yasuhiro Suzuki

These designed objects tie into this idea of metaphorical design, one that provides more depth of meaning then efficiency or function. They are like poems, getting us to question their hidden meaning, and connect to us in ways we couldn’t imagine.

 

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